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As we prepare for the new term, we’re delighted to announce that the Titus team has expanded once again. Marcus Green has joined our Moodle development team, bringing with him a wealth of experience in Moodle, as well as a background in teaching – a perfect fit for Titus Learning. Here, he gives some insight into his experience with Moodle, his vision for the future of educational technology and what he gets up to away from the computer screen.

How long had you been working in the educational technology field before joining Titus?

I started work as an FE teacher in 2003, and then worked for 3 years at a University doing Moodle development and system administration. Most recently, prior to joining Titus Learning I worked as a contractor for Moodle HQ.

Which areas of educational technology interest you the most?

Any type of automated marking, for example Moodle quizzes, and making systems so easy to use that teachers and students don’t need any instructions. I am also very interested in Learning Analytics though I am very aware how it can be mis-used and result in importance being attached to things just because they are easy to measure, not because they are useful.

What was it that attracted you to the role at Titus?

I was attracted by the energy and enthusiasm which the Titus team have, and I liked the idea of working for an ambitious company with an international outlook. When I first visited, I was also thrilled to find their headquarters at Salts Mill as I have been visiting Saltaire and the mill for over 20 years – it’s a beautiful part of the world.

What are you looking forward to about the new role?

I am looking forward to combining my technical and my people skills and to interact with front line Moodle users. I have spent plenty of time using Moodle myself, mainly working on the technical side of things but I’m keen to see how the technology facilitates real-life teaching and learning both for staff and students.

What do you think has been the biggest shift in educational technology during your time in the sector?

It’s hard to believe now, but when I started teaching in 2003 almost everything was printed out or in textbooks and there was little use of the internet. In those days technology was about the promise of smart boards and what might be done in the future. Now web-based technology is absolutely central but there is still a huge amount to be learned.

How do you see educational technology developing over the next few years?

Mobile and tablet devices will be extremely important. I think that very few of the generation born today will ever use any other type of computing device. Huge resources are going to be put into learning analytics though it may be some time before the benefits are significant. With Moodle currently on 100 million users globally (and that is a minimum figure), I believe we will see at least a billion users within my lifetime.

What are your interests outside of the office?

I play guitar, piano and drums (though not all at the same time), and also sing and write songs, occasionally performing charity gigs as a solo artist. I bake my own bread with my trusty Panasonic bread maker and am delighted every time it comes out well, even though I have been doing it for years!

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